Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Brighid and grief

Bennie and I have been working on devotional pieces through Joanna Powell Colbert's course, the Lady of the Radiant Flame, in honor of Brigid our Matron Goddess in studio and home. There is an interesting flavor to devotional (or icon) art ~ one of attention rather than presence. The random addition of an element finds no comfort in this form unless certain elements have been put into place first. Focus is on those parts that bring one closer to Source ~ the image that resonates (or No Image), certain symbols associated with the Being honored and, maybe, a few of one's own symbols with one's own associations ~ these are the foundation for icon art. This month has been an intense concentration on Our Lady of the Flame, Healer, Poet, She of the Forge, Lady of Sacred Wells.

And so we have been busy . . .

My piece in progress. It's been delicious layers upon layers of creation!

Bennie's in progress with her own depiction of Brigid.
Along side this creativity, I've been dancing with Brigid in Joanna's companion course, 30 Days of Brigid, making the practice of such attention a daily one. Today's art prompt was Grief. It is a difficult subject at best. How do I show grief? How do I show it with a simple Instagram photo? In many ways, I'm done crying or keening (as Brigid had done upon the death of her son). Grief has moved to the back burner of my mind, left on a slow simmer. A dull ache I may only feel on creaky mornings and usually worked out with asanas or feeding the flock. Grief. Not good grief. Not bad grief. Just grief in its griefness. I might have simply chosen a photo of one I've grieved over, but that is not the grief. The grief is mine and mine alone, not the Beloved Dead's. They are not grief. They've transcended all that.

I chose this . . .

Grief : : #30daysofbrigid
The more I look at this image, the more I can relate to it as Grief. There are layers and stories intertwined with this one image that spell it all perfectly for me. Brigid carries the keening.

1 comment:

Ashling said...

One almost has to look away from that image of grief...it is so personal, so private...