Friday, December 14, 2012

someone here asked so . . .

Two skeins of Jacob sudsing.
Here's how I set yarn. First I soak the skein in slightly soapy water which amazingly enough after scouring and other processing (this Jacob came to me as roving) still has a fair amount of dirt in it. After the skein is squeezed out (not wrung), it sits in another bath of the same temperature to rinse out the suds. Once the skein is squeezed out again, it goes into an empty washer and set on Spin to further wring out water. Then it's off to a few days of hanging. There's plenty of fiber folks that would add weight to the skein to really work out the kinks, but I don't bother with that. The occasional twist is a welcome distraction during knitting and reminds me I'm working with something hand crafted, not factory-processed yarn.

Setting yarn gives it a nice hand after spinning and plying as well as setting the twist or keeping the wool spun. I find the yarn loftier and, in some cases, slightly fulled or fluffed adding a certain cozy factor to the knit project. It seems an arduous step in wool processing, but well worth the results. I manage to find a rhythm in the sudsing, soaking and wringing of skeins adding other activities in between. Sort of keeps me awake a little longer at night getting things done. Then it's off to bed with sugar plum faeries and dreams of knit projects yet to come.
Icky water from the first bath.

Left to hang and dry for a few days.

Between skein setting I did a journal page . . .

started an I-cord and gathered materials for the
Bloody Stupid Johnson hat . . .

and these white leather gloves are just screaming
for some Sharpie action!


1 comment:

Ashling said...

Ah....I was taught the 'whacking' method, which involves the baths but then progresses into a session of beating the skein against a table leg or other hard surface. Same result, different technique....